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Eirenicon

What is to be held 'de fide'?

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What is to be held 'de fide'?

Despite Newman's pouring cold water on his schemes for union, Pusey insisted on his point about the difference between what had to be believed and what might be believed.

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Marian excesses

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Marian excesses

One of Newman's complaints with the Eirenicon was that Pusey had ransacked the most obscure texts and taken extravagant descriptions of Our Lady as typical and representative.

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'Full liberty of thought'

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'Full liberty of thought'

Newman here draws an important distinction between official doctrine and pious practice, noting, in true irenic fashion that it isn't possible to drawn a hard and fast line between the two.

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Faith and Devotion

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Faith and Devotion

As we have seen, Newman took the view that Pusey's high ecclesiology was not enough; it was too dry of the devotion which faith calls forth. This, for Newman, was why Pusey failed to understand what Marian devotion was about.

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Newman and Pusey

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Newman and Pusey

Newman had not been keen on the publication of the Eirenicon, but it provided him, as he came to see, with an opportunity to say something significant about Roman Catholicism. If even Pusey was taken in by the extreme rhetoric used in some quarters and mistook it for Catholic doctrine, then others did the same; there was a task to be done here, and Newman was the one to do it.

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Unity

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Unity

Unity, Pusey argued, comes from Christ, and God alone identifies his church.

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Manning on the Church of England

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Manning on the Church of England

Pusey's hope that Manning would regard the Church of England as a 'bulwark against unbelief' was rudely shattered by Manning. The extracts here give some idea of the tone and content of Manning's response.

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