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Bede's death

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Bede's death

Today is the feast of St Bede, the father of English history, the patron saint of English historians, and so we take time out from Newman to meditate on his example.

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Pius IX and the English

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Pius IX and the English

In this second extract from Newman's lecture in Birmingham in 1880, Newman reflects on the way in which the personality of the Pope had impacted on the way Protestants saw the Catholic Church.

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Protestants and Catholics in England

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Protestants and Catholics in England

Speaking in Birmingham in 1880, Newman reflected on the great changes he had seen in his lifetime in the relationship between Protestants and Catholics. Acknowledging that not all the problems created by a history of mistrust had been overcome, he still thought things much better - and headed to be even more so.

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Praying for the conversion of England

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Praying for the conversion of England

Speaking on the 'conversion of England' was a controversial topic in 1880, but as this extract shows, Newman, whilst always admiring the martyrs of the past, was less enamoured of the efforts of those who ruled the country.

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Popes and Infallibility

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Popes and Infallibility

In this second extract from his 1851 Lectures on the present position of Catholics in England, Newman examines one of the causes of the misunderstandings between Protestants and Catholics.

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Protestant misunderstandings of Catholicism

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Protestant misunderstandings of Catholicism

Newman's 1851 'Lectures on the present position of Catholics in England' sought to discover some of the sources of Protestant misunderstanding of Catholicism. Here we see Newman suggesting that one of the problems lies in the way Protestants approach the subject.

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Contesting with Rome

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Contesting with Rome

Tract 71 opens with a critique of why Anglican clergymen were so bad at apologetics, and ends with a plea for them to be better at combatting the claims of Rome; ironic in hindsight.

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Via Media II

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Via Media II

Tract 38 took further the arguments used to defend the view that the Church of England was part of the 'one holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church'.

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The Via Media?

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The Via Media?

Tract 38 on the Via Media reads ironically in the light of Newman's conversion, and one wonders, even here, about the extent to which he believed his own answers?

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Changing the Liturgy

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Changing the Liturgy

Although the opening of Tract no. 3 refers to the Anglican liturgy, the comments Newman makes and the arguments he uses have about them a timeless quality.

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What is to be held 'de fide'?

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What is to be held 'de fide'?

Despite Newman's pouring cold water on his schemes for union, Pusey insisted on his point about the difference between what had to be believed and what might be believed.

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Marian excesses

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Marian excesses

One of Newman's complaints with the Eirenicon was that Pusey had ransacked the most obscure texts and taken extravagant descriptions of Our Lady as typical and representative.

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